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bookpunks

Book Punks on BookLikes

Obsessive reader, writer, time traveler.

Currently reading

Doomsday Book
Connie Willis
Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung
Lester Bangs, Greil Marcus
Book of Shadows
Phyllis Curott, Lauren Marino
Wastelands: Stories of the Apocalypse
George R.R. Martin, Stephen King, John Joseph Adams, Paolo Bacigalupi, M. Rickert, Octavia E. Butler, Cory Doctorow, Carol Emshwiller, Gene Wolfe, Jonathan Lethem, Orson Scott Card
For the Win
Cory Doctorow
Zone One: A Novel
Colson Whitehead
Ten Thousand Miles by Freight Train: A Memoir of Beauty and Freedom on the Rails - Carrot Quinn Three times a charm. And how. My third e-book reading experiment was to read Ten Thousand Miles by Freight Train by Carrot Quinn who I'd known through her blog and mutual friends for years, but have never met. She's an excellent writer of the Annie Dillard school, and her prose has come a long way since she first started telling her train hopping tales on the internets. Her recent post about How to Be Poor is the most wonderful thing I've read on the subject in a long, long time. (Maybe ever? My memory is not whole enough to say for sure. If you are thinking about quitting your job, this is on the syllabus.)

The main downside to e-booking so far, has come at review time. I enjoy reading on my phone. I enjoy the convenience of always having a couple of books with me, but I haven't gotten the hang of marking passages yet. This, in combination with the format, means that, come review time, I can't sit down to thumb through it again, letting my eyes find passages of interest a second time, helping me sum up the experience in words. Scrolling just doesn't do it for me, and my eyes are less likely to stick somewhere relevant on a screen. But! The find feature! Because of the find feature I can share my favorite metaphor—and Carrot is quite good with metaphors—in the entire book, can give you a tasty little morsel to get you ready for a delectable meal.

Carrot is describing hitch hiking, and the way that the people who pick you up tend to spill their life stories. Why do they do this? "Talking to you is like stuffing a note into a bottle and tossing it into the sea." Brilliant.